Buying property abroad can be hard but is especially harder when considering the current political impasse. After the prime minister, Boris Johnson, received the Queen’s approval to suspend parliament for five weeks from early September, in a move that has been criticised as “profoundly undemocratic” and “sinister,” Brexit continues to be one of the thorniest issues in the UK.

Brexit and expats

This is why, when thinking of moving abroad, British retirees might need to firstly research and understand the complexities of post-Brexit life outside the UK.

What would a long-term residency mean, or what would be the changes to pensions for Brits abroad. For example, it is unclear whether transfers to a Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme will be tax-exempt post-Brexit. Additionally, for anyone considering buying property abroad, the biggest issue is currency volatility and its impact on international money transfers. Once you decide to buy your property and want to transfer funds to pay for your property, you don’t want to find that your hard-earned money was significantly affected by the movement of the pound due to Brexit developments.

What to consider when deciding to purchase a property

Researching and understanding local laws regarding buying a property should be one of your first steps. The process of buying a property abroad will be different from place to place, with specific laws and regulations for foreign residents buying property. If you would like to invest in a property abroad to let it afterwards, you should most likely follow the same steps, and research the laws about renting. You don't want to spend a large sum of money on a property that will be chained to a set of rules and limitations, something that will eventually hurt your funds. While you might be looking at European countries such as Spain and France, you might as well do your research regarding other countries where housing prices, the pound's exchange rates, and the local laws are most favourable to you.

Buy to let

Investing in a property abroad that you can also let is a way to increase your income, so deciding the right location and price, and understanding its potential and rental yield are important factors. If you are unsure, discussing this with mortgage brokers, financial planners and accountants might help you decide on whether this is a good investment.

When you deal with tenants, it will be good to have a mediator such as a property manager, who will help you find the right tenant and organise maintenance issues. As long as you are prepared to maintain a property abroad and make it attractive to tenants, then you would also be prepared to pay the costs regarding maintenance and renovation.

Buying a property

Once you have decided on a property, you need to make sure that all papers are in place and all processes are transparent. Get receipts and documents to prove your transactions or agreements and never leave anything to chance. You must always get the title deeds to the property or land, so you know that you own what you have paid for. Also, you need to be aware of any outstanding utility bills or local tax from the previous owner of the property.

If you require financial help to purchase your property, you can get a mortgage, but first do your research and find the right mortgage lender for you. You will need specific mortgage from a bank that supports your chosen country. As it is a competitive market, there are lots of options for you, so get the right solution to meet your own borrowing needs.

Transferring money

When you’re buying property, you’ll need to transfer money overseas. Universal Partners FX is a leading foreign exchange specialist that can assist you with your international currency transfers and save you significant amounts of money on large transfers. UPFX will provide an affordable way to transfer money overseas and protect your funds from foreign exchange risk. Get in touch today to find out how much they can save you on your international money transfers.

The UK and Korea have signed a continuity Free Trade Agreement (FTA) that will ensure that businesses can trade uninterrupted after Brexit.

As it stands, Brexit is at the centre of the UK’s political and financial struggles, with Brexiters putting more pressure on the government.

Farage: “Deliver of politically die”

During a speech at a Brexit party event, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage warned prime minister Boris Johnson that the Brexit party will fight the Conservatives in “every single seat up and down the country” if Johnson returns to Theresa May’s deal. The former UKIP leader highlighted that Johnson’s political career depended on him delivering a “clean break Brexit.” The prime minister had requested from the EU to re-open the withdrawal agreement that they reached with Theresa May in order to make changes, but he has been clear that the UK will be leaving on 31 October with or without a deal.

But beyond Farage’s threats and political braggadocio, Johnson cannot be driven by passion or instinct. Instead, now is the time to deliver politically conscious and responsible solutions that will irreparably affect the lives and livelihoods of British people in and outside of Britain.

As we increasingly move towards the possibility of a no-deal Brexit, opposition MPs have began thinking of how they can pass a law blocking a no-deal Brexit. Another solution to stop no deal is to bring down the government via a no-confidence vote. A No 10 source accused the MPs of "seeking to sabotage the UK's position.”

Trade deals that will guarantee continuity of trade post-Brexit

As the CBI warned, “trade continuity must prevail if business is to thrive.” It is essential for companies to continue trading "on pre-agreed terms, avoiding tariffs and other market access barriers." In order to avoid businesses' disruption and secure the smooth trading, the government would need to focus on securing more trade continuity agreements. With Brexit around the corner, the UK is pushing to agree on trade deals with its trading partners, signing so far 13 trade continuity agreements with 38 countries, including Norway and Chile. These trade continuity agreements cover countries accounting for £89 billion of trade, an increase from £39 billion in March 2019.

UK and Korea continuity free trade agreement

The UK and Korea continuity Free Trade Agreement which was signed on 22 August aims to help businesses continue trading freely after Brexit happens on Thursday 31 October. The Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss and the Korean Minister of Trade, Yoo Myung-Hee signed the agreement, which marks the first post-Brexit deal in Asia. Trade between the two countries totalled £14.6 billion in 2018.In 2017, 6,900 British businesses exported goods to Korea, worth around £5.8 billion.

The agreement secures British jobs in such important sectors as manufacturing, technology and professional services. Secretary of State for International Trade Liz Truss MP said: “My priority is to make sure that British businesses are fully prepared for Brexit and ready to trade on Thursday 31 October. That’s why I’m delighted to sign this trade deal today with one of the biggest markets covered by existing EU trade agreements. It will allow businesses like Bentley and Denby to keep trading as they do today, and they will be able to take advantage of the opportunities that Brexit offers.”

Trade Minister Yoo said: the “signing of the FTA will remove much Brexit uncertainty out of our long, valuable economic partnership. In this challenging time, we took a proactive step, and as a result, our Free Trade Agreement today sends a signal to the world of our strong, collective support for free, open, rules-based trade. Building on today’s signing, I hope to see further deepening of our economic partnership, and Korea and the UK walking together on the path of prosperity and a brighter future.”

Businesses welcome the trade agreement

Businesses in automotive, technology, renewable energy, retail and ceramics were positive for the trade agreement as Korea is a significant trading partner. Exports to Korea include British cars, which in 2018 increased to £943 million. According to the government's press release, Bentley's classic luxury car saw a "thirty-fold increase in exports between 2006 and 2015, from 10 cars driving on Korean roads in 2006 to over 380 in 2015."

Exports of ceramic products from the UK to Korea were around £17 million in 2018, and the British ceramic company Denby sells its ceramics in over 40 department stores in Korea.

Brexit developments

While the UK-Korea agreement is welcome news to many businesses, it is hard to see what will happen post-Brexit. If you are an importer or exporter who regularly trades within and outside the European Union, you are most likely affected when transferring funds cross-border. Ideally, getting in touch with a leading foreign exchange broker such as Universal Partners FX will help you navigate the current volatility and safeguard your funds. Give UPFX a call today and find out how much they can save you on your international money transfers. 

 

Exchange rates are the price of foreign currency that an amount of one currency can buy e.g. one-pound sterling. An increase in the value of the sterling means one pound can buy an increased amount of foreign currency, meaning you are getting more for the same amount of money. Businesses that import and export goods need to pay close attention to these exchange rates as the value of goods are highly sensitive, chopping and changing with the constant fluctuations. Businesses that trade domestically must also be aware of changes in exchange rates as they will have an indirect impact by virtue of the wider economy. So, how exactly do exchange rates affect a business? We will look at some examples below and click here to see how your business can stay protected.

 

Selling overseas

If you run a business that sells products or services to a country abroad, then a change in the exchange rate will have a direct impact on your bottom line. The force of the impact will be dependent on how invoices are issued. If invoices are submitted in the foreign currency, a risk remains where you will receive less money than expected if the exchange rate moves against you from the time the invoice as issued and date of payment. Issuing invoices in your local currency should have a lesser impact, as the overseas buyer must change their local currency into yours to make payment. You'll receive the full invoice amount regardless of where the exchange rate sits. The potential risk here is that your prices may become uncompetitive as a result of variations to the exchange rate, leading to lost market share against foreign competitors who do not have to include transactional exchange rate changes. 

 

Buying overseas

As with selling overseas, if your business contracts with a supplier from a foreign country, you become vulnerable to fluctuations in the exchange rate. For example, if you purchase goods from a supplier in China and payment of 300,000 Chinese Yuan for your next shipment is due in a month's time with an exchange rate of 8.74, your invoice would sit at £34,330.83 if paid today. However, in a month's time when the payment is due if the exchange rate has moved to 8.8, your invoice would change to £34,090.90, meaning you're paying £239.93 less for the same shipment of goods. Of course, if the exchange rate was to go the other way, you would have to pay more for the same amount of goods. Some businesses put forward contracts that fix exchange rates for a set period in place to help reduce the risk to the business.

 

Indirect impact

Changes in the exchange rate can also indirectly impact your business, even when you do not buy or sell goods and services overseas. For example, if you transport products around the country using delivery trucks and the cost of fuel is raised due to changes in the exchange rate, you will end up paying more for your shipments to be delivered. Exchange rate volatility can also have an effect on competition. Depreciation of your local currency makes the cost of importing goods more expensive, which could lead to a decreased volume of imports. Domestic companies should benefit from this as a result of increased sales, profits and jobs.

 

Universal Partners FX are an FCA regulated foreign exchange service, offering a range of products that can help protect your business. We are listed by the UK Government's Crown Commercial Service as a recommended FX provider, so if your business is in need of professional and expert advice for dealing with exchange rates, then please do not hesitate to contact one of our foreign exchange experts today. Alternatively, visit our business foreign exchange page to learn more about how we can help you.

 

Buying a property abroad can be difficult especially with the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit. But considering the advantages and disadvantages, and doing your own research wisely, you will be able to buy a property without throwing your life savings away. It will be good to discuss your property purchase with a currency specialist who will help you understand the market and offer assistance when making large or regular international transfers. This will be significant particularly due to the current political chaos in the UK. On Wednesday, Merkel gave the prime minister an ultimatum to find a solution with regards to the Irish backstop, as the pound slipped to low levels, close to the ones seen back in January 2007.

Brexit

In his meeting with Merkel, Johnson accepted the German Chancellor’s "blistering timetable" admitting that it was the UK’s burden to find a solution to the political deadlock. In his familiar humorous style, Johnson repeated Merkel's campaign slogan "Wir schaffen das," or "we can do it," causing laughter among the Chancellor and reporters.

In a Bloomberg article, it was reported that after Boris Johnson’s letter to EU officials, the French government now expects the U.K. to leave the EU without a deal, something that would immediately install border controls at the end of October.

The article notes that with Johnson becoming prime minister, EU officials believe that a no-deal Brexit would be the most likely outcome, as the UK “doesn’t have a realistic plan for an alternative to the backstop. The measure is despised by ardent Brexiteers in Johnson’s Conservative Party because it keeps the U.K. tied to many of the EU’s customs and trading rules, and Parliament has rejected the Brexit deal three times.”

Buying your dream or retirement home

Despite the political deadlock in the UK, if you have made your research and you are certain about moving abroad and purchasing your dream home, then there’s a few things you need to have in mind.

First, you should research the area of your desired property and find out the benefits of living in that neighbourhood. Are there any amenities nearby, is there access to the beach or the motorway, and generally, what is the atmosphere and feeling of the area and community? You will have to live there and, perhaps, in the future, sell the property with significant returns. So, trying to get the best deal for the best location will definitely enhance your investment in the future.

Make sure that you are not buying something you have never seen in person before. In the case that a developing company will take care of the construction of the building, but you have only saw the plans, do your research beforehand and find out whether the developers are reliable. Having a contract that guarantees that by the end of the project you will get what you were promised is the most secure way to safeguard your interests. Not only foreigners, but locals have fallen in the trap of buying a property but not the land is on, resulting in court cases and lots of stress.

Talk to the experts

From currency exchange brokers, to mortgage brokers and lawyers you will need specialist help when deciding to relocate and purchase a property abroad. In this sense, you will need to factor in costs for legal advice, taxes, notary fees, utilities, such as electricity, water, and gas connections.

Buying a property in France or Italy, 10%-12% of the property’s purchase price would go to cover government taxes and legal fees, while in Spain can go up to 12%-16%.

If you are buying property abroad, it is very important to go to a specialist such as Universal Partners FX. With the current volatility and weak pound, it is best that you contact a currency specialist as soon as you start the buying process, so that you get the best exchange rates possible and pay the minimum amount of fees. UPFX conduct in-depth market analysis, use state of the art technology and can offer access to the best exchange rates available. Get in touch with them today to find out how much you can save on your currency transfers.

On Monday, Tony Lloyd, the shadow Northern Ireland secretary, said that Boris Johnson was pursuing a Brexit that was either “disastrous” or a “fantasyland wishlist.”

Lloyd was responding to a letter that the prime minister had written to the EU about reopening the Irish backstop issue and suggesting its replacement by some form of commitment that would guarantee the prevention of a hard border between the UK and Ireland. Johnson’s new position contradicts his previous support of Theresa May’s deal. As Tony Lloyd said: “Boris Johnson seems to have forgotten that he voted for Theresa May’s deal including the backstop. Whichever Brexit outcome he pursues, whether it’s a disastrous no-deal or this fantasyland wishlist, Boris Johnson clearly has no qualms about putting jobs, rights, prosperity or peace in Northern Ireland at risk.”

While Johnson believed that the EU will be receptive to his proposal, on Tuesday Donald Tusk rejected his request. As a response, a Downing Street spokesman said: “that unless the withdrawal agreement is reopened and the backstop abolished there is no prospect of a deal. It has already been rejected three times by MPs and is simply unviable as a solution, as the PM’s letter makes clear.”

Johnson has stated on more than one occasions that he is willing to crash out of the EU without a deal on 31 October, despite warnings that the UK will face food and medicine shortages.

The letter

Johnson’s letter is an attempt at negotiating with the EU which appears as a regressive move, bringing up again the controversy around a hard border with Ireland that the EU and many in the UK and Ireland are clearly against. Before meeting European leaders, Johnson addressed the four-page letter to the President of the European Commission Donald Tusk saying that the backstop is “anti-democratic and inconsistent with the sovereignty of the UK.” He added that there could be different customs arrangements at the Irish border within the two-year transitional period after Brexit. However, having some general commitments in place that would prevent a hard border until the proposed system was agreed, was also a solution, Johnson noted.

But the EU does not wish to renegotiate the withdrawal agreement and the backstop. According to Guardian sources: “There was a two and a half year negotiating process in which the EU compromised, including on the question of the backstop. The withdrawal agreement is not open for renegotiation and the backstop is not open for change. A legally operable backstop to avoid a hard border remains central to the withdrawal agreement for the EU27.”

Johnson said: “I propose that the backstop should be replaced with a commitment to put in place such arrangements as far as possible before the end of the transition period, as part of the future relationship. I also recognise that there will need to be a degree of confidence about what would happen if these arrangements were not all fully in place at the end of that period. We are ready to look constructively and flexibly at what commitments might help, consistent of course with the principles set out in this letter.”

In the letter, he claims that the backstop is anti-democratic because it could force “the UK potentially indefinitely into an international treaty which will bind us into a customs union and which applies large areas of single market legislation in Northern Ireland”.

But an EU source described the letter as “a total moving of the goalposts on an issue of great importance and sensitivity that affects the lives of people on the island of Ireland.”

What happens next?

Johnson has also been accused by Tory MPs who have written a letter saying that the prime minister is preparing for a no-deal Brexit as his demand for the abolition of the backstop is simply impossible.

According to No 10, the prime minister has been clear: “there cannot be any actual negotiations unless the backstop goes; that’s the message he has delivered to leaders in his phone conversations and he will do that face to face. We have been clear that what the EU needs to understand is unless the withdrawal agreement can be reopened and the backstop abolished, there isn’t any prospect of a deal.”

Johnson will be meeting Merkel in Germany on Wednesday and on Thursday Macron, but the eyes of EU leaders will be on the UK, Tory MPs and opposition leaders as they attempt to block a no-deal Brexit on 31 October.

Are you importing or exporting?

If you are an importer or exporter who transfers money internationally, you are aware of the unpredictable movements of the pound due to Brexit and ongoing political developments. Universal Partners FX can offer valuable assistance, in-depth knowledge of the markets and tailor hedging strategies to help you make the most of your money. Give them a call today and find how much you can save on your international money transfers.

Buying property in France or Spain has recently been complicated due to Brexit. For many Brits already living there, there are still many questions, a lot of them related to health and access to medicine. The possibility of a no-deal Brexit overcomplicates things too. Let’s see what a no-deal Brexit involves and what it means in terms of health for the many Brits who already live or want to move there.

What is a no-deal Brexit?

No deal means that the UK would leave the European Union (EU) without any agreement about the status of their future relationship. In a matter of fact, it would immediately be left out of the single market and customs union, and consequently lose its privileges of trading between EU members without complex checks and tariffs (on imports). But this will also have a massive impact on other facets of our lives steeped in European institutions and regulations. We will leave the European Court of Justice and Europol, its law enforcement body, and lose our membership of many other EU bodies including the European Medicines Agency (EMA) responsible for the evaluation and supervision of medicinal products. 

While Theresa May has strived to pass her Brexit deal through Parliament, a deal which would at least ensure that the UK would be guaranteed a 21-month transition period to organise the situation and have time to negotiate a trade deal, this is now not the case. On the contrary, with PM’s Boris Johnson’s declarations of leaving the EU with or without a deal, the possibility of a no-deal Brexit is back on the table.

No-deal Brexit

Leaving without a deal means that the 1.3 million Brits living in the EU are suddenly left in a very complicated situation. By crashing out of the EU, means leaving behind the institutions that have for all these years protected us and given us security, health insurance and various other agreements that benefited us and guaranteed our smooth stay abroad.

If you are going on holiday, the government has advised that you buy travel insurance before you leave. However, if you are living abroad, Spain has already agreed to guarantee continued healthcare access to tourists and British expats until the end of 2020, provided that the UK grants Spanish living in the UK the same rights.

In France, things are more complicated, especially for those that spend six months of the year there. Both British and French governments have advised British expats to apply for a Carte de Séjour residency permit, however, many prefectures have halted applications until Brexit becomes clearer.

According to The Local,  both governments are willing to come to an agreement on healthcare as many French people live and work in London, and many Brits live and work in France. Unfortunately, no bilateral talks can officially begin unless Brexit has happened.

For many Brits, the idea of facing medicine shortages and feeling totally helpless is a nightmare. Many have said that, diabetics are stockpiling supplies of insulin by giving themselves less on a daily basis” to avoid dealing with shortages in the possibility of a no-deal Brexit. As Euractiv reported, “many of Britain’s 3.7 million diabetics, who include Prime Minister Theresa May, depend almost entirely on insulin imports from continental Europe.The hormone, which is usually produced by the pancreas, helps diabetics regulate their blood-sugar levels. A no-deal Brexit would almost certainly mean re-establishing customs and health controls, which could lead to delays at the border.”

But as the UK, Spanish and French governments are willing to alleviate any problems and help European residents and expats get the healthcare they need, they will hopefully be no problems in the case of Brexit.

As you are deciding to buy property abroad and worry about currency volatility and political events such as Brexit that cause unpredictable market movements, it is a good idea to get in touch with a foreign exchange expert and discuss your money transfer needs. Universal Partners FX have years of experience in the foreign exchange industry and can offer assistance when making regular payments abroad and sending large amounts of money internationally.

Many businesses that export only to the EU do not have the necessary papers to continue trading after a no-deal Brexit, reports have shown.

According to the Liberal Democrats, statistics showed that no deal would be a “wholly irresponsible political choice,” but the government said that despite only a small number acquired the necessary documentation, these were nonetheless “the firms responsible for the bulk of exports to the EU.”

Once the UK crashes out of the EU, UK firms would require an Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) number to be able to comply with economic operators and customs authorities.

 What is an EORI number?

EORI stands for “Economic Operators Registration and Identification number” and can be used by both business and individuals when trading. The EORI number acts as an identification number in all customs procedures making processes efficient, not only for customs authorities, but also for statistical and security purposes.

The EORI number is made up of two parts. One includes the country code of the issuing Member State and the other a code or number that is unique in the Member State.

According to the European commission, a legal entity such as a company or a natural person can request an EORI. More particularly, “persons established in the customs territory of the Union should request the assignment of the EORI number to the customs authorities of the EU country in which they are established.” Also, “persons not established in the customs territory of the Community should request the assignment of the EORI number to the customs authorities of the EU country responsible for the place where they first lodge a declaration or apply for a decision.”

Exports and imports 

If you are a firm that exports and imports outside the EU, you will have an EORI number, but as The Guardian notes, “registration has become a pressing issue for the 245,000 who trade internationally only within the EU. A no-deal Brexit would be particularly difficult for them because, instead of having current rules apply during a transition, they could find their trading opportunities shut down after 31 October without an EORI number.”

In another article by the Business Insider titled “Just 3 in 10 British firms that export to the EU are prepared for a no-deal Brexit,” it is said that only a 27% of British businesses have secured an EORI number and that there is a growing concern that British businesses will not be prepared for a no-deal exit on 31 October.

Lib Dem MP Chuka Umunna obtained information from the Treasury that shows that many firms are simply unprepared for a no-deal Brexit. The figures also show that if exporters apply for an EORI number at the current rate, all businesses won’t be registered until maybe the start of 2021. Umunna said that the statistics show “an overwhelming majority of UK exporters to the EU are unprepared for a ‘no deal’ Brexit and will not be in a position to deal with the mountain of red tape and bureaucracy it will burden them with on 31 October.”

He added: “Pursuing a ‘no deal’ Brexit is a wholly irresponsible political choice of the new administration for which there is no mandate and which will put businesses and jobs at risk. Any form of Brexit will harm the economy and put obstacles in front of UK firms which is why Liberal Democrats not only want a final say for the people on any deal but are also the only party that can get into Government which is committed to stopping Brexit altogether.”

British small businesses are not prepared for a no-deal Brexit in October, and, as the Business Insider pointed out, are even less prepared than they were back in March. On the other hand, businesses that already spent millions of pounds for a no-deal Brexit in the spring are now less motivated to spend more money in case there are further delays, while others just simply cannot afford it.

Chancellor Sajid Javid’s announcement last week for additional no-deal Brexit funding is not especially encouraging as most of it will be used towards government competencies, and not really towards helping businesses prepare. 

A spokesperson for the HMRC – the department responsible for issuing EORI numbers – said it was doing “everything we can to help businesses get ready for the UK leaving the EU. Businesses who import or export goods need to take action, the first step of which is obtaining an EORI number (if they don’t already have one.) It’s simple and free and can be done online.”

If you are an exporter or importer and you worry about Brexit volatility, getting in touch with your currency exchange specialist will give you some peace of mind. Universal Partners FX are experts in the foreign exchange markets and can assist you when transferring large amounts of money or making regular international transfers. Get in touch with them today to find out how much you can save on your international money transfers.

(London, UK, August 05, 2019) Universal Partners FX is delighted to agree a partnership with the Timber Trade Federation (TTF), the UK’s largest membership body for the timber supply chain.

The two-year agreement - with a view to extend - means that Universal Partners FX act exclusively as the foreign exchange provider for all members of the TTF, providing critical expertise to businesses that are deeply impacted by overseas transactions, and the associated costs.

Director Oliver Carson added “Universal Partners FX believes that establishing meaningful relationships with clients is the key in an industry where trust is paramount. By working closely with members of the TTF, we can offer our tailored service that has been fine-tuned by amounting over 100 years of experience within foreign exchange”

“The added bonus is some of our executives are actually IOM3 certified as technicians for the Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining – making us a perfect fit for the industry.”

As an industry that is heavily reliant on importation, Universal Partners FX feels that a dedicated service can save the industry significant amounts of money on international trading, which can contribute to long term benefits for all members.

To show our commitment, we are offering all members of the TTF a free foreign exchange audit.  By calling 020 7190 9559 or emailing enquiries@upfx.co.uk members can discover if they have the best strategy to prepare for a ‘no-deal’ Brexit.

 

 

Press Contact

For more information, contact:

Jack Scorgie

020 7190 9559

jack@upfx.co.uk

Buying property abroad in Brexit times can be stressful, especially when Boris Johnson, the new PM, has announced that the government will be setting aside an extra £2.1bn for preparations in the case of a no-deal Brexit.

Nonetheless, many Brits continue to move to France, despite being considered a costly decision and one of the most expensive countries in the region. But, with its lifestyle, amazing food and cheap wine, and the fact that housing can be quite affordable in certain regions, make France one of the most attractive places to call a second home.

Brexit update

The extra no-deal Brexit funds will be used for stockpiling medicines, adding 500 more border officials and paying for a public awareness campaign about disruption. Johnson’s government aims to convince the European Union that the UK can handle a no-deal Brexit, and it will be able to do so, in three months, on 31 October. Johnson has clarified that he prefers to reach a deal with the EU.

Sajid Javid, the new chancellor, will provide a cash boost of £1.1bn with an extra £1bn available if needed, which means that this year’s spending will increase to £6.3bn.

Labour has criticised the spending which is an “appalling waste of tax-payers’ cash, all for the sake of Boris Johnson’s drive towards a totally avoidable no deal.” John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, said: “This government could have ruled out no deal, and spent these billions on our schools, hospitals, and people. Labour is a party for the whole of the UK, so we’ll do all we can to block a no-deal, crash-out Brexit, and we’ll deliver a transformative economic policy that delivers for the many, not the few.”

Meg Hillier, chair of the Commons public accounts committee said: “Just because Boris Johnson is making it sound like he’s fighting a war, with seven-days-a-week meetings in Whitehall, that is not licence to spend taxpayers’ money like water, throwing good money after bad. It is of course responsible for a government to be prepared for an emergency. But this is an emergency of the government’s own making – boring though it may be that taxpayers’ money could be spent on essential public services. There isn’t much headroom. There is a bit more than there was but not much. And I don’t think his spending pledges add up.”

The business group the CBI warned that neither the UK nor the EU are prepared for a no-deal Brexit on 31 October, as certain “aspects cannot be mitigated.” The Institute for Goverment on Monday said that there was “no such thing as a managed no deal” and that a “clean break” from the EU is just impossible.

In the meantime, conservative MPs are considering how they can stop a no-deal Brexit if Johnson decides to leave without a deal. Many of us are also considering escaping to France, as Brexit chaos appears unresolved and the situation in the UK is becoming more complicated day by day.

France

While data comparison from Eurostat shows that France “is one of the more expensive places in the EU, with most categories being above the EU average,” British expats still consider the place as an ideal destination for certain reasons. While Paris together with Singapore and Hong Kong are “the world’s most expensive cities,” according to The Economist, there are other places and equally attractive options in other parts of France.

Truth be told, cars can also be expensive, while bringing one with you from the UK and registering it after six months can be a complicated and expensive process. According to The Local, white goods, electronics, DIY equipment and building materials for house renovations, were listed among Brits’ most expensive items.

However, the cheap price of wine in France and its unparalleled quality is incredibly alluring. Especially, if you decide to live in the countryside, restaurants offer cheap meals but high quality. According to a British expat quoted in The Local: “All the villages within a 40km radius of me have small restaurants where I can get a superb lunch for €13-14 with ‘buffet à volonte', main course, cheese, dessert, coffee and red wine included. And the quality is way above any café I would find in the UK.” Drinking and eating local, as well as going to the cinema are some of the amazing and cheap things you can do in France.

Most importantly, the affordable properties you can find is an important incentive. According to The Local, “almost all readers named house prices as one of the country's big benefits.” Nigel Day in Charente said: “The price of houses, whether renting or buying (except in big cities and the Mediterranean strip) is still a bargain, although nothing like it was 15 years ago.” With cheaper "annual housing taxes,” Brits still consider France an ideal home.

If you are interested in buying a property in France, get in touch with Universal Partners FX to discuss the most affordable ways to transfer your funds and protect them from currency volatility due to Brexit. UPFX are foreign exchange experts with years of experience in the financial markets and can offer assistance to move your funds safely and fast. Give them a call today and find out how much you can save or your international money transfers.