Moving to Italy and buying property might be a dream for many, but what happens when Brexit is looming on the horizon and your EU status is suddenly questioned?

Brits can buy a property in Italy, despite being from the EU or not, so Brexit won’t have a big impact on your decision to buy property there. However, as with other European countries where Brits are relocating or buying a property as residents, you will have to register as a resident in Italy, check whether your passport is valid for travelling, exchange your UK driving licence for an Italian one, as well as register for healthcare. So, buying property in Italy means also deciding about your residency as you must register as an Italian resident if you are considering staying there for more than three months. 

Residency

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, the rights of all UK nationals living or working in Italy legally will be recognised by the Italian government. However, if there is no deal, UK nationals living in Italy will have to get a non-residence permit by 31 December 2020 to protect their rights to work, healthcare and social benefits.

When it comes to buying a property after Brexit, being a non-resident and non-EU national, will mean that you will have to use the house as your holiday home, while only being allowed to stay there a maximum of 180 days per year, but only 90 days at a time. If you buy the property as a resident, then you will have to live there for over half the year and state that the property is your main residence. This will lower the amount of money you have to spend on purchase and local taxes.

Buying a property

Buying a property in Italy is usually performed by a notary who is a qualified lawyer to conduct the transfer of the property between the seller and yourself. The notary will prepare the deeds, check for outstanding charges, and make sure that the property meets required standards. They will also make sure there is a translator present when you sign the legal contracts. The translator might cost you a couple of hundred euros.

As a buyer, you will pay the purchase taxes and the notary’s fees. The notary will be paid approximately 1-2 percent, depending on the price of the property.

Buying property as a resident or non-resident, as well as from a private individual or a company are factors that will affect the kind of taxes you will have to pay for your property. Buying from a private individual will involve paying the cadastral fee which is defined by the property’s size and location. Additionally, if you’re buying as a non-resident, you will have to pay taxes on the cadastral value, as well as smaller taxes. While buying a house as a resident will involve lower taxes and obtaining a residency permit within the next 18 months, only do so if you intend to become a resident, otherwise, you will still have to pay the relevant taxes plus a penalty of 30%.

For a property bought from a company, you will pay a similar cadastral value on the property as buying it from an individual, especially if you’re buying as a non-resident, but buying as a resident the taxes will be much lower. A more favourable situation arises when you buy a winery or a country property which will demand you to pay much lower taxes (just 1 percent on the purchase price in tax). If you are buying an Italian company for commercial use, then you only pay a few fixed fees and no taxes.

Can I buy a property in Italy immediately?

While the time depends on the individual case, you can usually finalise a sale within approximately 10 weeks, as there is paperwork to be completed, registrations to be updated and other related issues that might arise. If you arrange power of attorney, this might take longer, but if you are present yourself and the property is ready to go with all the relevant papers in place, then you are all settled, and the process can be quick.

In case, however, you don’t have the relevant funds in place, but you have fallen in love with a property, then it is possible to sign a purchase agreement in order to reserve it for maximum a month until you can sign the preliminary contract.  Paying a deposit of around €2,000 – €10,000 will protect you against any legal issues, but you will be unable to get it refunded if you no longer wish to buy the property.

Buying a property in Italy with a limited budget is also a possibility, as there are village houses or unrestored old properties that are much cheaper than modern buildings or properties in expensive areas such as Tuscany.

 

Foreign exchange specialists: Universal Partners FX

Whether you are on a limited budget or you can afford a luxury villa, you are still concerned about the value of your funds when you exchange them into foreign currency. In terms of currency volatility, things in Britain haven’t really changed. The prospect of a no-deal Brexit is extremely possible as the latest updates show.

With the Internal Market Bill fiasco and a continued stand-off over fishing rights, a no-deal may be the most likely outcome. Any news that comes out between now and the end of the transition period will certainly affect the euro rates one way or another. For example, if the Internal Market Bill is upheld, this will likely lead to legal action being taken by EU and further jeopardising a deal. Ongoing Covid-19 impacts will also affect the economy and the pound, but eyes will be on the EU as they consider more stimulus packages that will further increase debt and impact the euro.

One thing is for sure, it is hard work keeping track of rates so it is important to protect your funds by getting assistance from a currency specialist such as Universal Partners FX. UPFX can offer you the best possible exchange rates and can even fix exchange rates in advance to avoid market movements costing you money. Contact us today to find out how much money you can save on your international money transfers.

Brexit: Buying Property Abroad as Pound Tumbles

Buying property abroad has become more complex the last few years as Brexit uncertainty and the pound’s volatility continue to negatively impact the UK economy, with fears of a recession increasing.

Brexit update

On Tuesday (3/9), the pound experienced increased volatility, reaching its lowest level  in 34 years, from which it rebounded, as rebel Tory and opposition MPs attempted to block a no-deal Brexit. The prime minister Boris Jonson was eventually defeated. According to the so-called Benn bill, if he is unable to reach an agreement with Brussels in the next few weeks, he will have to delay Britain’s departure from the European Union until 31 January.

Sterling dropped due to fears of a snap general election, reaching its lowest level in more than three decades, with the exception of the October 2016 “flash crash." Ahead of the vote, and after Tory MP Philip Lee’s defection to the Liberal Democrats, it rose slightly.

“For all the uncertainty that lies ahead, markets see a Boris Johnson led no-deal Brexit as the worst-case scenario and thus treat anything that undermines that as pound positive,” said analyst at IG Joshua Mahony.

According to the Independent, a Bloomberg survey last month, showed that a delay was seen as the most positive outcome for the pound. Sterling has tumbled significantly since the EU referendum in June 2016.

Boris Johnson’s defeat by a margin of 328 to 301 on Tuesday, has put the prime minister in a precarious position, and has wounded his rhetoric of no-deal. As a result of his defeat, the prime minister said he would table a bill to trigger a general election, but Labour said it would not back his election motion, which requires a two-thirds majority to pass through the Commons.

On Thursday, the House of Lords voted in favour of getting the Benn bill, that will rule out a no-deal Brexit, through all the stages of parliament by Friday afternoon.

Buying your dream abroad

For many, the decision to buy a home abroad is not significantly affected by Brexit. They have prepared and have done their research and are confident that their decision is final. For them, consulting a leading expert in transferring money abroad has also given them peace of mind. Foreign exchange specialists such as Universal Partners FX have years of experience in international money transfers and can navigate volatile currency markets, saving you money and time. So, considering the current volatility and the weakness of the pound, getting help from UPFX will help you significantly when you make large international transfers to buy property abroad or pay related costs.

Residency rights

Due to the fact that many Brits are already living in countries such as France and Spain, and with more EU countries guaranteeing British expats post-Brexit grace periods, British expats are slightly less worried about Brexit, especially the ones already living there. As many European countries have pledged to offer legal residency rights to British expats in return for the same rights for European nationals residing in the UK, it is hard to see that certain freedoms will completely eclipsed after Brexit. For example, the Italian government has announced that British expats will remain legal residents in the event of no deal, while the Spanish authorities are saying British expats will have the same rights in Spain post-Brexit as long as Spaniards already living in the UK are offered the same residency rights.

France has also made sure to clarify its position on residency by passing a bill in the case of a no-deal Brexit, followed by a government decree. Like other European countries, France will apply these rights as long as the UK does the same for French nationals living in the UK. After Brexit, for example, Britons in France will have six months to apply for a residence card. During the one-year transitional period Brits will continue to have existing rights over residence, work and benefits, while they can enjoy access to healthcare for two years after Brexit. Remain in France and the UK government website provide more details.

So, if you are buying a home in a European country, you need to consider all the complexities of life abroad after Brexit. More importantly, as the pound continues to fluctuate, getting expert help from a foreign exchange specialist such as UPFX, will prove to be extremely beneficial especially when you are transferring your hard-earned money. Get in touch with them today for a quick quote and find out how much you can save on your international currency transfers.

With a no-deal Brexit most likely happening in a couple of months, experts have warned about how unprepared many trading companies are.  Service industries, such as finance make up 79% of the British economy and account for 45% of UK exports. A no-deal Brexit means that these service providers would lose access to European markets and might have to comply to new rules and regulations. According to Bloomberg Economics, in a “more benign no-deal scenario growth will probably slow sharply, while a more disruptive outcome would make a recession highly likely.”

The prime minister Boris Johnson has pledged to leave the EU by 31 October with or without a deal. Without a withdrawal agreement in place, the UK will crash out of the EU, lose its access to the single market and revert to the World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, having to deal with complicated restrictions and tariffs on exports. For many economists and business organisations, a no-deal Brexit will simply be disastrous for the economy.

Trading post-Brexit

While the UK has enjoyed tariff-free trade, after Brexit the UK will have to pay tariffs on UK goods and services. The change will hurt the UK economy, cause delays and increase costs and controls. Particularly, many financial companies are planning to move part of their operations to Europe to counteract the loss of access to their EU “passporting” rights and secure the smooth trading of goods and services with the rest of the world.

Similarly, UK prices will increase for EU imports such as food and cars. Cars will get a 10% tariff, clothes and linen a 12% tariff, while the UK will impose import quotas on beef, lamb, fish, poultry and swine.

The Bank of England has warned that Britain has one in three chance to plunge into a recession the beginning of the next year, as uncertainty over Brexit continues to affect the economy. In this climate, British businesses are stockpiling goods or plan to do so, as a hard Brexit will create problems at ports and hurt supply chains.  

Trading companies not prepared for Brexit

Carol Lynch, partner in Customs and International trade with the accountancy group BDO, said that only half of importers and exporters have signed up for the basic trading requirement. She said: "When we are looking at client reviews in terms of planning, the first question - particularly for vendors and suppliers - is have you got an EORI number. If you haven't, that's a very good indication that you haven't given any thought to future planning, deferred planning, tariffs, haulier preparations. The EORI is the very basic requirement.” For her, both imports and exports will be seriously affected by trade barriers. Lynch clarified: "Imports are especially important for consumers and manufacturers. Goods purchased from the UK and 80% of goods coming from Europe and outside of Europe come through the UK. It's critical and we'd be working with hauliers in making sure drivers are prepared and the right paper work has been handed in. Whatever chance you have of not being delayed is based on your preparations, that you know how to complete import declaration, that it's cleared and that you have that clearance slip in the cab so the driver knows what to do when they drive off the boat. There are a number of steps to ensure you can minimise the risk of delays which are, to a certain extent, inevitable.”

According to the Financial Times, France is already preparing for a no-deal Brexit by planning to trial an electronic customs system. The trial of the electronic customs system will commence in mid-September in Calais, ahead of a possible no-deal Brexit on 31 October. French minister in charge of customs Gérald Darmanin told French radio station RTL: “For a month, we’re going to pretend there is Brexit. For a lot of companies, we are going to have a sort of dress rehearsal so that we are ready at the end of October.”

If you are an importer or exporter, you must have experienced the general pessimism and uncertainty surrounding Brexit, while you might have been affected by the weak pound. If you want to protect your business and financial transfers, contact Universal Partners FX. UPFX will offer valuable support and assistance when transferring money internationally while tailoring hedging strategies to your business’ needs. Give them a call today and find out how much you can save on your international money transfers.

Buying a property abroad can be difficult especially with the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit. But considering the advantages and disadvantages, and doing your own research wisely, you will be able to buy a property without throwing your life savings away. It will be good to discuss your property purchase with a currency specialist who will help you understand the market and offer assistance when making large or regular international transfers. This will be significant particularly due to the current political chaos in the UK. On Wednesday, Merkel gave the prime minister an ultimatum to find a solution with regards to the Irish backstop, as the pound slipped to low levels, close to the ones seen back in January 2007.

Brexit

In his meeting with Merkel, Johnson accepted the German Chancellor’s "blistering timetable" admitting that it was the UK’s burden to find a solution to the political deadlock. In his familiar humorous style, Johnson repeated Merkel's campaign slogan "Wir schaffen das," or "we can do it," causing laughter among the Chancellor and reporters.

In a Bloomberg article, it was reported that after Boris Johnson’s letter to EU officials, the French government now expects the U.K. to leave the EU without a deal, something that would immediately install border controls at the end of October.

The article notes that with Johnson becoming prime minister, EU officials believe that a no-deal Brexit would be the most likely outcome, as the UK “doesn’t have a realistic plan for an alternative to the backstop. The measure is despised by ardent Brexiteers in Johnson’s Conservative Party because it keeps the U.K. tied to many of the EU’s customs and trading rules, and Parliament has rejected the Brexit deal three times.”

Buying your dream or retirement home

Despite the political deadlock in the UK, if you have made your research and you are certain about moving abroad and purchasing your dream home, then there’s a few things you need to have in mind.

First, you should research the area of your desired property and find out the benefits of living in that neighbourhood. Are there any amenities nearby, is there access to the beach or the motorway, and generally, what is the atmosphere and feeling of the area and community? You will have to live there and, perhaps, in the future, sell the property with significant returns. So, trying to get the best deal for the best location will definitely enhance your investment in the future.

Make sure that you are not buying something you have never seen in person before. In the case that a developing company will take care of the construction of the building, but you have only saw the plans, do your research beforehand and find out whether the developers are reliable. Having a contract that guarantees that by the end of the project you will get what you were promised is the most secure way to safeguard your interests. Not only foreigners, but locals have fallen in the trap of buying a property but not the land is on, resulting in court cases and lots of stress.

Talk to the experts

From currency exchange brokers, to mortgage brokers and lawyers you will need specialist help when deciding to relocate and purchase a property abroad. In this sense, you will need to factor in costs for legal advice, taxes, notary fees, utilities, such as electricity, water, and gas connections.

Buying a property in France or Italy, 10%-12% of the property’s purchase price would go to cover government taxes and legal fees, while in Spain can go up to 12%-16%.

If you are buying property abroad, it is very important to go to a specialist such as Universal Partners FX. With the current volatility and weak pound, it is best that you contact a currency specialist as soon as you start the buying process, so that you get the best exchange rates possible and pay the minimum amount of fees. UPFX conduct in-depth market analysis, use state of the art technology and can offer access to the best exchange rates available. Get in touch with them today to find out how much you can save on your currency transfers.

On Monday, Tony Lloyd, the shadow Northern Ireland secretary, said that Boris Johnson was pursuing a Brexit that was either “disastrous” or a “fantasyland wishlist.”

Lloyd was responding to a letter that the prime minister had written to the EU about reopening the Irish backstop issue and suggesting its replacement by some form of commitment that would guarantee the prevention of a hard border between the UK and Ireland. Johnson’s new position contradicts his previous support of Theresa May’s deal. As Tony Lloyd said: “Boris Johnson seems to have forgotten that he voted for Theresa May’s deal including the backstop. Whichever Brexit outcome he pursues, whether it’s a disastrous no-deal or this fantasyland wishlist, Boris Johnson clearly has no qualms about putting jobs, rights, prosperity or peace in Northern Ireland at risk.”

While Johnson believed that the EU will be receptive to his proposal, on Tuesday Donald Tusk rejected his request. As a response, a Downing Street spokesman said: “that unless the withdrawal agreement is reopened and the backstop abolished there is no prospect of a deal. It has already been rejected three times by MPs and is simply unviable as a solution, as the PM’s letter makes clear.”

Johnson has stated on more than one occasions that he is willing to crash out of the EU without a deal on 31 October, despite warnings that the UK will face food and medicine shortages.

The letter

Johnson’s letter is an attempt at negotiating with the EU which appears as a regressive move, bringing up again the controversy around a hard border with Ireland that the EU and many in the UK and Ireland are clearly against. Before meeting European leaders, Johnson addressed the four-page letter to the President of the European Commission Donald Tusk saying that the backstop is “anti-democratic and inconsistent with the sovereignty of the UK.” He added that there could be different customs arrangements at the Irish border within the two-year transitional period after Brexit. However, having some general commitments in place that would prevent a hard border until the proposed system was agreed, was also a solution, Johnson noted.

But the EU does not wish to renegotiate the withdrawal agreement and the backstop. According to Guardian sources: “There was a two and a half year negotiating process in which the EU compromised, including on the question of the backstop. The withdrawal agreement is not open for renegotiation and the backstop is not open for change. A legally operable backstop to avoid a hard border remains central to the withdrawal agreement for the EU27.”

Johnson said: “I propose that the backstop should be replaced with a commitment to put in place such arrangements as far as possible before the end of the transition period, as part of the future relationship. I also recognise that there will need to be a degree of confidence about what would happen if these arrangements were not all fully in place at the end of that period. We are ready to look constructively and flexibly at what commitments might help, consistent of course with the principles set out in this letter.”

In the letter, he claims that the backstop is anti-democratic because it could force “the UK potentially indefinitely into an international treaty which will bind us into a customs union and which applies large areas of single market legislation in Northern Ireland”.

But an EU source described the letter as “a total moving of the goalposts on an issue of great importance and sensitivity that affects the lives of people on the island of Ireland.”

What happens next?

Johnson has also been accused by Tory MPs who have written a letter saying that the prime minister is preparing for a no-deal Brexit as his demand for the abolition of the backstop is simply impossible.

According to No 10, the prime minister has been clear: “there cannot be any actual negotiations unless the backstop goes; that’s the message he has delivered to leaders in his phone conversations and he will do that face to face. We have been clear that what the EU needs to understand is unless the withdrawal agreement can be reopened and the backstop abolished, there isn’t any prospect of a deal.”

Johnson will be meeting Merkel in Germany on Wednesday and on Thursday Macron, but the eyes of EU leaders will be on the UK, Tory MPs and opposition leaders as they attempt to block a no-deal Brexit on 31 October.

Are you importing or exporting?

If you are an importer or exporter who transfers money internationally, you are aware of the unpredictable movements of the pound due to Brexit and ongoing political developments. Universal Partners FX can offer valuable assistance, in-depth knowledge of the markets and tailor hedging strategies to help you make the most of your money. Give them a call today and find how much you can save on your international money transfers.

Sterling has suffered after Boris Johnson’s no-deal Brexit rhetoric caused reaction among economists and cabinet ministers who continue to warn against it.

A free trade agreement after no-deal Brexit

Johnson’s government and figures in his cabinet, such as Dominic Raab, said that the UK would be in an advantageous position to negotiate a good deal after no-deal Brexit. European Union officials rejected Raab’s claim that agreeing on a free-trade deal after a no-deal Brexit would be “much easier.” A senior EU diplomat expressed the EU’s fears that a no-deal Brexit would trigger the destruction of political relationships and a rhetoric of blaming.

He said: “It would mean the complete breakdown of political relations and I don’t think there would be much trust on the EU side with the Tories, or with the prime minister. Eventually we would get around it because we are pragmatic, but this would be really, really bad, because of all the rhetoric around blaming.”

For another diplomat, after a no-deal Brexit, contact between the EU and the UK would break down: “Our phones will not be connected at that time … I don’t think they will be connected to someone who has reneged on their obligations.”

For the European officials, the most important element is to honour the three basic principles of the withdrawal agreement: citizens’ rights, the Irish border and the financial settlement.

Despite Johnson’s claims to the opposite, renegotiating a trade deal would be a lengthy and arduous process, something almost impossible. As Tanja Fajon, the Social Democrat member of the European parliament’s foreign affairs committee, said, renegotiating “a free trade agreement usually takes years and I believe the UK doesn’t have that time after a no-deal Brexit.”

In addition, Johnson’s character, his threatening attitude towards the EU, make him an unlikeable character according to the MEP, allied to the Labour party: “Who would want to do business with [Johnson] if he is serious with his threats not to pay €60bn (£54bn) debts to the EU? Who wants to deal with the country who doesn’t pay its bills?”

EU hoping for soft Brexit Tories to stop no-deal Brexit

 

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Raab said that it would be easier to deal with the Irish border through a free-trade agreement after the UK is released from the EU’s “demands and unilateral dictates.”

Over the weekend, it was rumoured that Johnson was “turbo-charging” preparations for no deal, while his strategist for a no-deal Brexit, Michael Gove, said the government was preparing for leaving without a deal.

 

But the EU is reluctant to reopen the deal that was agreed with Theresa May, hoping that certain Tories would try and prevent the hardcore Brexiteers from crashing out of the EU without a deal. The EU would seek to defend its own interests, a spokesman of the European commission said, as Johnson’s ministers continue supporting their no-deal Brexit plans.

He said: “The UK preparedness is not for us to deal with. Our no-deal preparedness protects the EU and our interests in the case of a no-deal Brexit. A no-deal scenario is not our preferred outcome.”

Universal Partners FX and hedging strategies against volatility

Whether you are an importer or exporter, or you conduct your business abroad through regular transfers of funds, the recent no-deal Brexit rhetoric has definitely affected your finances as the pound has sunk against the US dollar and the euro.

While the government would ideally want to avoid a no-deal outcome, leaving without a deal is increasingly becoming a very likely prospect, something that is worrying both investors and ministers.

If you want to hedge your funds and avoid currency volatility, get in touch with UPFX and find out how they can hep you navigate around political and financial uncertainty.

Liam Fox’s trade envoy Andrew Percy has resigned after attacking the government’s move to cut import tariffs if the UK crashed out of the EU without a Brexit deal.

Percy felt “patronised” by the international trade secretary and claimed that the government’s policy would threaten the existing trade deal with Canada, which is worth £800m. The resignation aims to underline that a no-deal Brexit will be disastrous for the UK as it questions Fox’s promise to replicate 40 trade agreements and ensure a smooth Brexit.

More resignations

In addition, the resignation is one among many, as a series of resignations by senior ministers were meant to thwart any moves towards a no-deal Brexit. The resignations by Tory MPs will also ruin Boris Johnson’s smooth march into Downing Street this week.

Philip Hammond and David Gauke’s resignations “highlight the perilous political climate for Theresa May’s expected successor.” With Johnson expected “to be announced on Tuesday as the victor over Jeremy Hunt in the vote of Conservative members,” the resignations hold an extra significance. It is not only Hammond and Gauke’s resignations, but there is a possibility of other ministers and junior ministers opposed to no deal, such as the international development secretary, Rory Stewart, resigning soon after.

Gauke  told the Sunday Times: “Given that I’ve been in the cabinet since Theresa May came to power, I think the appropriate thing is for me to resign.” He added: “If the test of loyalty to stay in the cabinet is a commitment to support no deal on 31 October – which, to be fair to him, Boris has consistently said – then that’s not something I’m prepared to sign up to.”

Gordon Brown has also come forward to warn against a no-deal Brexit, saying that future historians would view it as “an act of economic self-harm that runs wholly counter to the national interest.”

No-deal tariffs

Percy’s resignation is then another warning among many about the terrible impact of a no-deal Brexit. For him, a no-deal Brexit and cutting import tariffs were a huge mistake that would cost them existing trade deals. According to The Independent’s sources: “Andrew warned them back in March, as soon as the UK’s no-deal tariffs were published, that it would mean the Canadians would not go for rolling over the Ceta [Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement] deal. He could see they were getting 95 per cent of what they wanted if a no-deal happened, that the tariffs were better than what is in Ceta – so why would they rush to sign up to what the UK wanted? He said it was such a cack-handed approach, but he was patronised by a couple of ministers – including Liam Fox – and told that everything was going to be fine.”

In March, the UK announced that tariffs would be slashed “temporarily” on 87 percent of imports, after a no-deal Brexit. For this reason, Canada felt that there was no reason to carry over the Ceta, one of the most important of the 40 deals, despite pressure from the UK government.

Barry Gardiner, attacked Liam Fox for his lack of understanding of how international trade works and said that “Andrew Percy’s resignation, claiming he was patronised and ignored when he was clearly ‘telling it like it is’, is sadly typical of the arrogance Liam Fox displays to everyone who disagrees with him.”

Don’t let your finances be affected by Brexit

Boris Johnson might be closer to becoming a PM, but Brexit continues to be thorny issue, while the idea of a no-deal Brexit is becoming less appealing for more Tory ministers. Whether Johnson will get the UK out of the EU with or without a deal, or whether Fox really understands international trade, remain to be seen. But what is certain is your ability to make wiser choices and protect your business and finances from political and financial instability. A foreign exchange broker is the best choice for an importer or exporter who transfers money internationally and Universal Partners FX can offer valuable assistance when moving large funds abroad or making regular payments. Give them a call today and find how much you can save on your currency exchange.

Property in Spain

Neither a weak currency nor Brexit seem to deter Brits from dreaming of buying their property in Spain. According to removal company AnyVan, Spain is the number one desired destination for British expats, beating such places as Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Dubai.

 

AnyVan poll

In a new poll carried out by removal company AnyVan, people in the UK were asked where they would like to live if they could choose anywhere in the world. 13% of Brits said they would choose Spain, while a 12% said they would equally prefer New Zealand or Australia. Other popular places were the US (10%), Canada (9%), Italy (7%) and France (6%). The CEO of AnyVan, Angus Elphinstone, said: "It's nearly a national sport in the UK to dream about moving. From flicking through property prices and listings on Rightmove to sitting down to watch one of the vast number of primetime TV shows offering advice to those looking to change homes for a place in the sun. Our research highlighted where people dream to move to, but there were still 16% of residents who didn't want to move anywhere."

The research demonstrated the differences between ages, as younger people looked for career opportunities in wealthier and bigger countries, where they can work and live comfortably. For example, those under the age of 34 were attracted to the US, with 16% admitting the US was their favourite, followed by Australia and Spain. Dubai was also a favourite among the young, as 4% wanted to move to the Middle East. On the other hand, those over the age of 55, dreamt of moving to New Zealand (14%).

 

Spain: the UK favourite

It's not just because of the sunny Barcelona or Madrid, the flamenco, bullfights and paella. Spain is so much more for Brits and offers everything they could wish for away from home. It's a stunning destination, with a lively culture. But it has also started to improve economically, with youth unemployment being down to 33 percent from over 50 percent in 2013. This is a place where both the young and the old will get to enjoy a rich lifestyle, without feeling isolated or far away from home.

 

Buying property in Spain is not such a bad idea

Brexit uncertainty might not be a defining factor when choosing to move abroad, but it can definitely hurt your finances when transferring large sums of money. It is not surprising that many economists and business professionals are warning that a no-deal Brexit will make things even worse, as the price of the pound could plummet, while many businesses could be under threat. The pound is currently down, especially due to fears of a hard Brexit and because of Boris Johnson, the frontrunner to replace May, who has said that Britain could leave the EU without a deal at the end of October.

If you are enthralled by Spain and its people, and want to move there, Universal Partners FX can help you with your international transfers and explain the process of moving funds or making regular payments when buying a property abroad. UPFX operates with no hidden fees and ensures that multiple international payments are more cost-effective. With their comprehensive hedging strategies, you can get a level of financial stability and security. Their unparalleled customer service means that you can get hold of them at any time, and they will make sure that your money will get where it needs to be within 24 hours.

If you would like to learn more or want to just understand how currency experts can save you money, give them a call today.

Businesspeople chatting in a boardroom

A no-deal Brexit will affect the UK economy, despite Boris Johnson claiming otherwise. Johnson, who is the main candidate to become Britain’s next prime minister, has more than once argued that a no-deal Brexit is possible on 31 Oct., or, as he promised more recently, “do or die.”

Speaking to TalkRadio, Johnson said that Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement needed more than a few tweaks, and that “It’s got to be, you know, we need a new withdrawal agreement if we’re going to go out on the basis of a withdrawal agreement.” While, on certain occasions, he gave the impression to some MPs that he was unsure about leaving the EU on 31 October, with certain MPs he was quite definite about the departure date. When he was asked during the specific interview he persisted: “We are getting ready to come out on 31 October. Come what may,” and added, “Do or die. Come what may.”

But Johnson’s stance is considered rather dangerous as many economists and politicians have argued. Let’s see in more detail, how leaving the EU without a deal will affect the UK economy.

 

What economic impact would a no-deal Brexit have on the UK?

Bank of England governor Mark Carney has rejected Boris Johnson’s claim, as he confirmed that the “UK would be automatically hit by tariffs on exports to the EU.” Earlier this week, Johnson had said that tariffs would not be paid if the UK left the EU without a deal, due to article 24 of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) which covers the international trade in goods. Clearing the confusion, Carney said to BBC: “Gatt 24 applies if you have an agreement, not if you’ve decided not to have an agreement or have been unable to come to an agreement. Not having an agreement with the EU means that there are tariffs automatically because the Europeans have to apply the same rules to us as they apply to everyone else. If they were to decide not to put in place tariffs they also have to lower their tariffs with the United States, with the rest of the world. And the same would hold for us.”

A no-deal Brexit means that British exports would be hit with import tariffs which are currently around 2-3 percent for non-agricultural goods but are higher for cars and farm products. So, claims by Boris Johnson and other Brexiters saying that Britain could avoid these tariffs under world trade rules, have not only been rejected by the BoE’s Carney, but also trade minister Liam Fox, who also argued that an agreement with the EU would need to be in place.

In the possibility of a no-deal Brexit, Britain will eliminate import tariffs for many products for up to a year, something that would “reduce the inflationary hit to consumers but would expose many British companies to tougher competition.”

In a Reuters article, outlining the effects of a no-deal Brexit, it was pointed out that, based on Bank of England’s estimates, the UK economy could be shocked into a “5 percent contraction within a year, nearly as much as during the global financial crisis.” The same article also noted, that “Britain’s finance ministry says the economy could be 8 percent smaller by 2035 after a no-deal Brexit than if it stayed in the EU. The hit would be bigger if migration slowed sharply.” A no-deal Brexit would deter foreign investors, while Britain’s current account deficit would make Britain depend on, what Carney has called, “the kindness of strangers.”

Finance minister Philip Hammond has warned that a no-deal Brexit would postpone the government’s plans to end austerity, while Brexiters have argued that leaving the EU with no deal would help the public finances as the UK will stop payments into the EU budget.

 

Are you worried by a weak pound?

A no-deal Brexit would probably push the pound down, which will consequently drive inflation down.

If you are a business importing or exporting goods and services to and from the EU, you are possibly worried about an abrupt hard Brexit without a transition deal. Universal Partners FX have all the right international payments and FX hedging solutions for your business, so that you access the international market without any worries. Take advantage of their expertise in foreign exchange and get in touch with Universal Partners FX today.

Buying property abroad

With no-deal Brexit being on the table again, is this the right time to buy your property abroad?

Former cabinet minister Oliver Letwin was behind cross-party efforts to block a no-deal Brexit. The Labour-led attempt to eliminate the possibility of crashing out of the EU without a deal was defeated by 11 votes, after 13 abstained and eight more Labour MPs voted with the government. Despite the efforts of 10 Conservatives who rebelled by voting against the government, the option of a no-deal Brexit is back to haunt us.

Letwin, disappointed, said that the parliament was now out of options to protect the UK from a hard Brexit, after the defeat of Labour’s motion. Talking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, he said: “We have run out of all the possibilities that any of us can at the moment think of.” Letwin added: “If the government doesn’t bring something before parliament, parliament won’t have a chance to take a view on that.” For him, it was impossible that Tory MPs would vote against the government to prevent a no deal scenario. Letwin said: “Evidently that’s not something any of us want to do. I’m not confident as things stand that the current Labour leadership would know how to solve this crisis either.” Letwin also expressed that he was not sure whether Boris Johnson was a “no-deal Brexiteer” but he did admit that Johnson was “clearly quite likely” the next prime minister.

Another former Conservative MP, Nick Boles, who voted with Labour on Wednesday, was vocal about the lack of options on the horizon in terms of a no-deal Brexit and said that the only alternative was a confidence vote to bring down the government. He said: “No-deal Brexit on 31 October is back to being a racing certainty. It is very hard to see where any further legislative opportunities will come from. So it’s now a question of politics – specifically whether a PM pursuing a no-deal Brexit can command and sustain the confidence of the House of Commons.”

 

Government victory: Is no-deal still an option?

Leading candidate to be Britain’s next prime minister, Boris Johnson, said that he will try to have a deal in place, but he did not explain what he would do if he could not come to an agreement with Brussels. Nonetheless, he supports leaving exactly on the appointed deadline, on 31 October, with or without a deal.

As many have argued, including Boles, the only remaining option is to bring down the government. Even former attorney general and Conservative Dominic Grieve agreed that he would vote against the government in a no-confidence motion, if someone like Boris Johnson tried to take the UK out of the EU without a deal. He said: “If we get to a point where a prime minister is intent on doing this [taking the UK out of the EU without a deal], the only way of stopping that prime minister would be to bring down that prime minister’s government. And I simply have to say here and now I will not hesitate to do that if that is what is attempted, even if it means my resigning the whip and leaving the party.” Chancellor, Philip Hammond, also suggested he might act similarly. In the possibility that the government loses a no-confidence vote, alternative leaders would only have two weeks to assemble a parliamentary majority, otherwise, a general election must be called.

 

Buying Property with Universal Partners FX

The pound fell after Labour’s motion was defeated, while markets tried to digest Boris Johnson’s campaign which was launched officially on Wednesday.

As the horizon appears to continue being clouded in uncertainty, currency volatility and market expectations will be influenced by Brexit developments. So, if you are considering buying property abroad, Universal Partners FX is the best choice to offer support, guidance in times of uncertainty and competitive currency exchange rates. Operating with no hidden fees or extra costs, UPFX are the ideal partners to help you navigate the markets and transfer your funds effectively, hassle-free. With a set of comprehensive hedging strategies to provide financial stability, UPFX will aim to get you the best prices in FX.

 

Get in touch with your dedicated currency broker to find everything you need to know about international transfers and the ways UPFX can make your funds prosper in the current currency