Sterling rose after renewed hopes that a Brexit deal is still possible, as the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is heading to Brussels for a meeting with the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen. Heightened volatility is expected as the meeting could take place any time this week or over the weekend, with any rumours possibly to move the currency.

On Monday, the GBP suffered losses after news that the negotiations reached a stalemate, and the PM stated that he was willing to walk away. But, later, on Monday, as it was announced that Johnson would be travelling to Brussels for a face-to-face meeting with von der Leyen, the pound regained some of its losses. News about the meeting is not yet clear and markets expect the two to either meet on Wednesday or possibly Friday. On Thursday, a meeting of European Council EU leaders will also take place, and many predict that the meeting with von der Leyen could even take place in the weekend, to allow EU leaders to approve of a new mandate for the EU Commission President before the meeting.

With confidence dwindling and the possibility of a deal becoming more and more distant, markets will remain sensitive to any Brexit updates. While everyone was expecting Johnson and von der Leyen to discuss over the phone, the announcement of a physical meeting caught markets by surprise. At the current moment everyone hopes that a breakthrough could be reached by an intensification of negotiations at a more personal and political level.

What to expect for Sterling in 2021?

A lot depends on a positive Brexit outcome. The currency is also correlated with global business and economy, so any general positive upswings will also boost the pound. According to economists at Oxford Economics, global economy will expand and the UK will benefit from the trend, especially after being so badly impacted by the pandemic.

However, if both sides fail to reach an agreement, the Pound could fall below parity, as many believe there is much more downside risk than upside. There is a real risk to the outlook of the UK economy and the pound if a no deal outcome ensues, but, at the same time, there are multiple scenarios possible: a deal or no deal, as well as a so-called cooperative no deal and an uncooperative no deal. An uncooperative no-deal Brexit will be more disruptive than a cooperative no-deal Brexit, in which the EU and the UK will be able to cooperate on a number of pressing emergency issues.

The UK government announced on Monday 7th Dec. that they will remove those elements that the EU openly disagrees with in the possibility of a trade deal, including the law-breaking clauses of the Brexit Bill. However, the clauses might return if a trade deal is not agreed, which will point towards a hard, uncooperative no deal Brexit. In this scenario, the pound will fall to the lower end.

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The possibility of striking a Brexit deal before the weekend has helped to stabilise the pound as it recovered some ground, on Thursday. However, tensions are building ahead of the weekend as talks continue. This means that any Brexit-related headlines will create pound volatility and move the market considerably.

The clock is ticking

While markets are hopeful that a deal will be reached, the fact that the clock is now ticking with little space for manoeuvres means that the pound will remain sensitive. The Telegraph reported that Barnier told EU ambassadors that the UK has become more flexible and lowered its demands in regard to UK waters post-Brexit, demonstrating that the two sides are closer to an agreement. Fisheries and governance remain unresolved, with the latter to be negotiated once all other agreements are settled. Talks could now focus on the percentages involved in fisheries, but France might prove to be uncompromising on its fishing demands. According to The Telegraph, "Fishing nations such as France, Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium and Spain fear Mr Barnier may cave too easily to British demands as talks enter their endgame. Paris insists the UK red line of annual fishing negotiations is unacceptable.” France has already clarified that it will veto any deal that goes against their interests.

A report in The Times said that "France and other hard-line countries are pushing for no deal in Brexit talks to soften up Britain before a reset in negotiations next year, unless the government makes significant concessions in the coming days," and unless the UK "backs down over the next 48 hours", a period of 'no deal' will "bring a chastened Britain back to the table next year".

The BBC's Europe Editor Katya Adler said that Brussels believe a deal will be possible in the event that the UK makes significant steps to meet the demands regarding fisheries, competition rules and governance.

Talks continue in London

Negotiations are at the final stages, but it appears that any last hurdles will require, maybe not divine intervention, but at least some help from leaders from the UK, EU Commission and France. Both Wednesday and Thursday, saw negotiators working well into the night for the final push.

On Friday, The Telegraph reported that talks will find Boris Johnson and Emmanuel Macron coming head to head this weekend, with France interested in securing access to fish in British waters.

According to certain sources, Macron's officials have been "lobbying hard" among different member states to agree to added demands on fishing, state subsidies and non-regression clauses, and these will be discussed by both the PM and the French president over the weekend.

EU member states could also veto any deal as they continue to have concerns about state aid mechanisms and how to enforce agreed environmental and labour standards. France and Denmark are reluctant to lose their fishing shares in UK waters.

Indeed, there is not much time left now, as negotiations continue and the upcoming EU leaders’ meeting on 10 and 11 December 10-11 means that a final deal needs to be ready to be agreed. Sterling will make significant gains if a deal is announced in the coming weeks and it could potentially continue to rise.

 

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The pound appears to have risen ahead of the weekend, as Brexit negotiations continue. EU ambassadors have been told that a trade and security agreement with Britain is almost ready to be finalised as gaps on the contentious issues are “slowly shrinking.”

Both sides however remain inflexible, with European politicians saying that there remains work to be done and the UK saying that the EU needs to compromise. The risk of a no-deal Brexit in six weeks is still high.

According to a Bloomberg article, the UK “hasn’t moved sufficiently to overcome the main obstacles to a post-Brexit trade deal as three of the bloc’s leaders called for contingency plans to be stepped up in case there is no agreement.” Secretary General of the Commission Ilze Juhansone told envoys from the EU’s 27 member states on Friday that “negotiations could now slip into December as progress has been slow.”

On the other hand, the report noted that "The U.K. government has said that both sides have already made concessions on the three remaining areas of disagreement - access to British fishing waters, the level playing field for business, and how any deal is enforced - but that it’s up to the EU to make the final compromises."

A report on Reuters, stated that EU diplomats reported that “The European Union and Britain remain at odds in last-ditch trade talks over fishing rights, guarantees of fair competition and ways to solve future disputes, even though they are very close to agreement on other issues.” A senior EU diplomat told Reuters that “We are both close and far away. It seems that we are very close to agreement on most issues but differences on the three contentious issues persist.” Officials will continue negotiations online, as on Thursday it was announced that direct talks were suspended after a member of the EU team tested positive for COVID-19.

Negotiations are stuck

Negotiations have not progressed much as both sides remain unyielding on the main points: “Some things on the level playing field have moved, albeit very, very slowly. Fisheries are not really moving anywhere right now.” In terms of state aid, Britain has offered to set up a regulator for corporate subsidies, as the EU requested, but this was rejected as the body needed to be independent from the government and with a clear authority. Another EU official said that “negotiators mostly focused on such elements of corporate fair play as well as divvying up fishing quotas in recent days: ‘Both of these are still very stuck.’”

Pound Rises despite Brexit deadlock

The pound has risen against the Euro, Dollar and other major currencies, as negotiations continue. Markets remain confident that both sides will strike a deal despite the persistence of major differences. In the possibility of a trade agreement being reached the next two to three weeks, the EUR is expected to fall, something that will also be supported by positive news about a vaccine for Covid-19.

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While investors have been preparing for a Brexit deal as early as next week, official briefings on Thursday and Friday are expected to cause volatility. On Thursday, the pound fell as global markets turned cautious after a “media report that EU leaders will demand the European Commission publish its plans for what will happen if there is no deal,” Reuters reported.

On Thursday, EU leaders will address outstanding issues like fisheries and “level playing field” provisions as they meet via a video call. Executive Vice President of the European Commission Valdis Dombrovskis said: "We're in the final push. There are still important elements to be resolved, substantial work to do. We've seen many deadlines come and go but there's one we'll not be able to move - Jan 1. We're now in the last moments."

Bloomberg News reported that a new trade agreement between the UK and Canada, could come as early as Thursday: “Reports that the UK and Canada are very close to reaching a post-Brexit trade deal are undoubtedly good news for both economies, but with time dangerously running out on a EU-UK trade deal, sterling is struggling to react positively to the news.”

Thursday and Friday to create pound volatility

The Sun newspaper’s Nick Gutteridge said that France will be determined to retain its access to UK waters post-Brexit and if it does not move on fisheries this could create more anxiety for markets. The UK is said to expect a final push from various leaders in the summit as they put more pressure on the UK for more concessions. Thursday’s summit might have a negative impact on the pound as markets reconsider the possibility of a deal.

On Friday, EU Chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier will brief European representatives of the EU's 27 member states, and markets will be closely watched for any signs of a deal. UK Chief Negotiator David Frost had told Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Tuesday that a deal was possible as early as next week.

How the pound will react?

“Observers still expect a deal early next week or in the first week of December. Market participants are similarly not that concerned over the risk of No Deal Brexit at this point in time,” wrote MUFG strategist Lee Hardman. “There is likely to be a much larger pound move to the downside if both sides fail to reach a deal (-5% to -10%), while we expect a modest move to the upside for the pound if a deal is finalized (+1% to +4%),” he said.

Analysts at UBS noted that there will be a "meaningful bounce" in the Pound if a deal is signed: "The latest news flow points to an agreement being struck just in time for ratification by the EU Parliament. Given markets - and hedge funds specifically - are relatively under-positioned for such an outcome, we’d expect a meaningful bounce for GBP on even a confirmed ‘skinny deal’ outcome." But a positive outcome also means good news for the pound and the UK economy which they tend to benefit if the global economy is doing well. The UBS analyst stated: "This is intuitive given the degree of openness of the UK economy and bodes well for a recovery in global growth into 2021. Naturally, the link has weakened since the 2016 referendum, but cheap valuations offer some hope of at least a partial snap-back in compensation. And the UK economy stands to benefit more than most in 2021 as it was hit particularly hard by this year’s pandemic.”

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With the ongoing Brexit negotiations and unexpected volatility, contacting a currency specialist could save you time and money. If you are sending your family members money, get in touch with Universal Partners FX to find out how much you can save in your international money transfers. Universal Partners FX can provide invaluable help on efficient risk management and tailored solutions to your personal transfer needs.

 

 

Sterling extended earlier gains after a report that the UK and the European Union could agree on a trade and security deal some time next week. Optimism regarding striking an agreement has given the pound fresh impetus, despite that time is running out.

Economists believe that Sterling could strengthen more by mid-2021 if a free trade agreement is reached, as officials are expecting news of some form of progress as early as Monday. British and European parliaments will still need to confirm the terms of the agreement before the transition period ends on 31 December. At the moment, investors remain hopeful, but the possibility of the talks stalling as major differences cannot be bridged is strong, and in such a scenario the pound would likely fall.

Newspaper reports suggest a trade deal is possible

During the week, various newspaper reports have suggested that a trade deal is "just days away" with the Telegraph saying that Ireland believes there are "landing zones" for an agreement and that France has accepted the restrictions to its fishing rights in UK waters after the transition period ends. The newspaper also reported that "the trade agreement could be announced as early as Monday, sources in Brussels suggested – but only if both sides made compromises on issues such as fishing and subsidy law." On Tuesday, the Sun newspaper said a deal could be expected next Tuesday, as the UK Chief Negotiator David Frost said to the Prime Minister Boris Johnson to prepare for a trade deal on Tuesday, news that have helped lift the pound.

Despite positive but unofficial reports in British newspapers, both the EU and UK have not offered a definite answer about the status of the negotiations which means the possibility of a no deal is still a valid outcome with some analysts remaining very cautious. At the same time, the markets seem to have made peace with a possible no-deal scenario, so any news of a deal, no matter what that deal is, will lift the pound. However, a possible deal will only mean temporary and limited gains for the pound according to some analysts, while for others, a considerable rise should be expected.

Brexiteers feel stuck as no deal impossible

The UK is now trapped and will be unable to benefit from Brexit, said former Brexit Party MEP Ben Habib. Habib, who attacked the PM saying that a no deal Brexit was not possible, said in an interview to Express.co.uk, that "We are already stuck, to some extent, in the gravitational pull of the European Union.” For hard Brexiteer Habib, a no deal Brexit would allow the UK to completely cut its ties to the European Union, but, unfortunately, this is not possible anymore. As he said, "We have a deal of some description from which we simply cannot escape."

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Sterling rose after a Bloomberg article yesterday (28 October) reported that a Brexit deal was closer into view as talks progressed. Both sides were participating in an intensive round of negotiations in London, and, on Thursday, the talks will move to Brussels. If more progress is made by 3rd of November, the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen will then have to negotiate a final agreement.

Today, though markets remain nervous ahead of the US GDP and ECB meeting as the escalating Covid-19 pandemic has triggered renewed fears of a double dip downturn. With a second lockdown in France and new restrictions about to be imposed in Germany, investors are on edge.

Pound rises on Brexit progress

European Union and UK negotiators managed to resolve “some of the biggest disagreements that have long bedevilled the Brexit talks, raising hopes that a deal could be reached by early November, according to people familiar with the discussions,” Bloomberg noted.

According to the article, sources said that the deadlock has been broken after seven months of negotiations, but traders will still need to see more solid evidence to be convinced of any progress. The sources reported that both sides are working on “the text of an agreement on the level competitive playing field and are close to finalizing a joint document covering state aid.” They have also “moved closer to deciding essential aspects of how any accord will be enforced,” the sources added.

The news pushed the pound higher against the Euro and the majority of its G10 peers. While markets remain cautious, some economists believe that there are positive signs for reaching a trade deal.

The Brexit news should offer support to a pound that has been very sensitive to Covid-19 developments, at a time where lockdowns are devastating economies. In the event of a second wave the pound will definitely remain sensitive and could weaken, and analysts say that positive Brexit news might not be enough to support the pound in the current volatile environment. In this respect the upside potential for the pound is seen to be limited, as many more issues remain to be resolved regarding the Brexit talks, despite recent news.

Despite the recent doom and gloom, there are potential business opportunities to be had with Brexit, “from fishermen to airlines and insurers,” according to an article.

Risks to the pound

Sterling has been sensitive to Covid-19 updates and Brexit news, and it will remain so. According to Pound Sterling Live, “An obvious risk for those watching Sterling exchange rates is that negative Brexit news - which would most likely be a stalemate on fishing - combines with 'risk off' market conditions to trigger substantial declines in value.” But the stimulus support from Central Banks might be enough to support world economies and protect from unexpected currency declines seen in the aftermath of the first wave of Covid-19.

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A weak US dollar and rising hopes for a trade deal between the European Union and Britain helped Sterling rise on Tuesday afternoon.

Analysts are now saying that the pound could rise further in the event of a post-Brexit trade deal. This, of course, is something we have seen every time that there was any positive news pointing to a breakthrough to the negotiations. Sterling fell immediately after the UK referendum vote to leave the EU in June 2016, as political uncertainty hurt the pound. Since then, Sterling has been volatile every time news was released regarding Brexit and has fallen on news of a stalemate in the negotiations or disappointing updates from both sides. As we are nearing the end of the Brexit transition period, and the possibility of an agreement appears more certain, the pound will most possibly react positively and rise.

A possible agreement by mid-November will support the pound

Optimism regarding the trade talks has risen recently after the EU’s negotiating team and Michel Barnier the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator said that they will resume talks in London until Wednesday 28 October and many reports have noted that an agreement could be reached by Saturday, 31st October 31.

Any time from now until the middle of November, when a possible deal might be reached, Sterling could strengthen as long as the two sides ensure that a no deal scenario is not in the cards.

By reaching an agreement, both sides will provide certainty to businesses and investors, eliminating uncertainty, restoring sentiment and offering relief to the pound.

USD weakness to support the pound

For many analysts, the pound might rise, but this might not be a sharp rise and it will only be the result of a depreciation of the USD. At the same time, they predict that a strategic buying of Sterling in anticipation of a deal being reached might be possible, but this will be short-term.

According to Pound Sterling Live, Rabobank see potential for the GBP/EUR exchange rate to rise if a Brexit deal is announced, but such a rise will be limited.  Jane Foley, Senior FX Strategist at Rabobank said: "We don’t expect that relief at the end of the Brexit process will be sufficient to divert attention away from a poor set of UK fundamentals," she adds.

"If we are wrong on the market’s assigned relative probabilities, then Sterling will move more or less than we expect. Given the better mood music of recent weeks, risks appear skewed in favour of a smaller move,” Paul Robson, Head of G10 FX Strategy EMEA at Natwest Markets said. But they also highlighted the issues lying ahead, including that of companies having to adjust to the new realities after Brexit and the potential disruptions in various sectors, including the auto industry that were recently highlighted by the automobile sector.

Potential threats ahead

Economists are emphasising the fact that Brexit will not only disrupt various industries and create uncertainty about the future of businesses, but it will add to the UK’s existing problems. The economy is currently hit by Covid-19, government finances are deteriorating, and lockdown restrictions are hurting the economy further. With a weak economy and limited investment flows, the pound might have a rocky road ahead, with or without a Brexit trade deal.

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European automobile manufacturers have called on the EU to take a softer stance regarding the UK’s future market access, and they warned that the bloc’s harsh position could have long-term effects on the automobile industry. In June, more than 50 European and British food and drink trade associations wrote to Brussels to request for more flexibility, underlying the fact that a tariff-free trade agreement needed to be coupled with the assurance that businesses will be able to benefit from it.

Why does the manufacturing sector worry?

For UK and EU importers and exporters, it is important to maintain a frictionless access to the single market. Manufacturing businesses are aware of the damaging effects of Brexit and the ensuing disruptions to their sector. Brexit-related uncertainty has made it very difficult for most sectors to prepare for a post-Brexit business environment and reduced the possibility of securing investment.

UK manufacturing is integrated into the EU single market, as almost half of all UK goods imports and exports are with the EU. Many UK manufacturers are dependent on frictionless trade with the EU so their supply chains are not interrupted. With the possibility of a no deal Brexit, manufacturing sectors are concerned about a potential lack of regulatory alignment with the EU as no business wants to lose the privilege of free trade.  According to independent research from the UK in a Changing Europe initiative, some sectors, such as automotive, could be severely affected if they have to pay tariffs to export cars to the EU in the absence of any agreement with the EU. As they warned, “In almost all cases, Brexit will create additional financial or other cost burdens for companies: tariffs, customs declarations, certification costs, audits to ensure rules of origin compliance, loss of collaboration opportunities in R&D, border delays, EU customers switching to other suppliers, visa costs for EU workers, and so on.”

Letter from the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA)

In a letter from the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) last week, the association which represents  some of the biggest car manufacturers in the world, including BMW, Toyota and Fiat, warned Brussels that some aspects of the bloc's current stance are "not in the long-term interests of the EU automotive industry.” The ACEA urged the EU to "reconsider its position" on tariff-free trade. In its letter, sent last Thursday, 15th October, the ACEA requested from the EU to reduce the percentage of car components manufactured in Europe or Britain so that the businesses can benefit from any EU-UK trade deal. The car manufacturers are urging that the new rules be introduced slowly so that the automobile industry has the time to prepare and adjust for the new rules and environment. For EU manufacturers, an agreement that provides tariff-free, quota-free trade on all goods is crucial.

EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier has told businesses that “short-term adaptation costs” were necessary to protect “long-term economic interests.”

Nicolas Peter, BMW’s finance director, has said in a press conference last week: "The European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA) has estimated that it could cost car manufacturers and suppliers from 10 to 11 billion euros, so we need tariff-free trade. And even then, it must be seamless. We have a just-in-time production system, so customs administrative processing must be efficient."

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Pound volatility is expected to be high today and on Monday as the markets await Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision on whether the UK stays or leaves the Brexit negotiating table.

In the meantime, England is dealing with the rise of new Covid-19 cases and restrictions which will come into force under the government’s new three-tier system with London facing tighter restrictions from midnight on Friday.

Under this generalised gloomy climate, investors are waiting to hear whether the UK will continue with the Brexit talks. Last month, Johnson had set a deadline for a possible deal for the 15th October, and said that if nothing had been agreed, both sides should “accept that and move on.”

At a Brussels summit on Thursday, the EU proposed “two to three weeks” of negotiations. Investors are now closely watching to see whether the PM will try and resume the negotiations or stick to his threats and walk away.

Brexit pessimism pushed the pound lower against the US dollar, while it remained flat against the euro. At the same time, the prospect of tighter lockdown restrictions could further hurt the pound and threaten economic recovery. Jasper Lawler, head of research at LCG, said that more lockdown measures could push the UK and European economies into a deep recession: “The British government is under pressure to follow scientific advice for a 2-week circuit breaker national lockdown but has so far resisted, but has raised the capital to the Level 2 tier of restrictions. That means two different families can no longer mix indoors- be that in their home or in a pub or restaurant. There is still no sign of the joint European recovery fund so in the meantime economies stand to take the hit – risking a double dip recession – from the new restrictions.”

Angela Merkel urges Boris Johnson to keep negotiating over Brexit

The German chancellor has urged Boris Johnson to continue and not to walk out of the trade and security negotiations. In her comments that were designed to calm the atmosphere, Merkel said that both sides needed to find common ground: “In some places things have moved well, in other places there is still a lot of work to be done. We have asked the United Kingdom to remain open to compromise, so that an agreement can be reached. This of course means that we, too, will need to make compromises.” Her comments also come after Thursday’s summit where French president, Emmanuel Macron, demanded that the UK accept the bloc’s conditions or face a no-deal exit.

The EU had proposed a further “two to three weeks” of negotiations as the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier is scheduled to be in London on Monday to continue negotiations. Like Merkel, Barnier also said that the EU wants to give every chance to the negotiations so they are successful: “We’re available, we shall remain available until the last possible day.”

The UK’s chief negotiator, David Frost, expressed his disappointment after Thursday’s summit and tweeted: “Disappointed by the conclusions on UK/EU negotiations. Surprised EU is no longer committed to working ‘intensively’ to reach a future partnership as agreed with [the European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen] on 3 October. Also surprised by suggestion that to get an agreement all future moves must come from UK. It’s an unusual approach to conducting a negotiation.”

The foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, said that a deal was still possible: “We’ve been told that it must be the UK that makes all of the compromises in the days ahead, that can’t be right in a negotiation, so we’re surprised by that, but the prime minister will be saying more on this later today. Having said that, we are close [to a deal]. With goodwill on both sides we can get there.”

While challenges remain when it comes to the Brexit negotiations with the level playing field, fisheries, and governance, still unresolved, many are positive that there could be an agreement if significant work is done.

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International businesses have been preparing for Brexit while carefully watching updates regarding the coronavirus pandemic and slow economic recovery. On Friday, news that the UK borrowed a record of £35.9bn in August, with borrowing since August hitting £173.7bn, while factory output dropped 44% last month, have added to concerns of a weakening economic recovery.

Importers and Exporters Facing New Customs Controls

UK cabinet minister Michael Gove, in a letter to logistics groups, has already stressed the government's analysis in regards to the potential disruptions that could affect importers and exporters once the Brexit transition period ends.

The cabinet document stated that queues of up to 7,000 trucks might form in Kent, resulting in two-day delays in the worst possible scenario. The document also said that, "Irrespective of the outcome of negotiations between the UK and EU, traders will face new customs controls and processes. Simply put, if traders, both in the UK and EU, have not completed the right paperwork, their goods will be stopped when entering the EU and disruption will occur."

On a more general note, but equally worrying, reacting to Brexit, JPMorgan has decided to move $230 billion in assets from London to its Frankfurt-based subsidiary in Germany.

UK Borrowing Increases, as Car Production Drops

Britain’s economy has been terribly hit by the Covid-19 pandemic as it was announced on Friday. The government borrowed £35.9bn last month according to the Office for National Statistics. The UK has now borrowed £173.7bn since the start of the financial year in April, as a result of the pandemic. August’s borrowing has pushed the UK’s national debt to £2,023.9bn, and the ONS estimates that UK borrowing could exceed £372bn for the current financial year.

The ONS says the increase in borrowing was caused by a fall in tax receipts, and the ongoing cost of protecting the economy. Central government tax receipts are estimated to have been £37.3 billion in August 2020 and central government bodies are estimated to have spent £78.5 billion on day-to-day activities (current expenditure) in August 2020. Britain can borrow at record lows and the Bank of England is prepared to expand its bond-buying QE programme (currently £745bn) if it is deemed necessary.

According to the Financial Times’ Chris Giles, today’s borrowing figures, do not include expected government costs: “The UK’s public finances have continued on a path towards a record peacetime deficit in 2020-21, with the central government borrowing £221.2bn in the first five months of the financial year to combat the coronavirus pandemic. Although that figure was lower than the Office for Budget Responsibility, the fiscal watchdog, had expected, the official statistics are yet to incorporate expected losses on government-backed loans to companies and £24bn of new spending for the NHS, vaccines and coronavirus testing the Treasury revealed on Thursday. The £221.2bn central government cash requirement between April and August was 11 times greater than the highest ever cash borrowing figure at this point in the financial year since equivalent records began 36 years ago.”

August’s borrowing reflects higher spending to tackle the coronavirus pandemic as over £10bn was spent on the retention and self-employment schemes in August.

Car Manufacturing Falls

Additionally, UK car manufacturing declined -44.6% in August with the ongoing coronavirus crisis making efforts to increase output more difficult as demand overseas has weakened. Production this year is down -40.2% with a loss of 348,821 units.

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders has reported that the UK car manufacturing fell 44% last month compared with August 2019. Factories’ exports and domestic orders fell dramatically.

Mike Hawes, SMMT chief executive, said: “These are increasingly disturbing times for UK car makers and suppliers with the coronavirus crisis weighing heavily on the sector. Companies are bracing for a second wave with tighter social and business restrictions making the industry’s attempts to restart even more challenging.”

Are you a Business Transferring Funds Abroad?

If you are an exporter or importer and worried about your international trade costs, and the volatility of the British pound, you should get professional assistance when transferring funds abroad. Get in touch with Universal Partners FX to find out about efficient risk management and tailored solutions to your business’s transfer needs.