With Britain’s future trade relationships in question, and a no-deal Brexit looming on the horizon, the government has been preparing for post-Brexit agreements in an attempt to minimise the effects of Brexit.

New Zealand and Britain trade deal

On Monday, Britain’s Trade Minister Liz Truss said that striking a trade deal with New Zealand would be a priority, as officials are working to create continuity and support their non-EU trading partners. Truss, is on a three-nation tour, which includes New Zealand, Australia and Japan, a trip that hopes to pave the way for trade negotiations after Brexit. Ahead of her trip, Truss said: “We’re going to be leaving the European Union on October 31 with or without a deal and as part of that agenda, striking trade deals much more broadly than we have been doing is going to be vitally important. Striking a free trade deal with New Zealand is a very important priority for the UK. It’s one of the first trade deals we expect to strike.”

Official data shows that trade between New Zealand and Britain is at about NZ$6 billion (£3.1 billion), with New Zealand being Britain’s 43rd largest trading partner in 2017.

New Zealand’s Trade and Export Growth Minister David Parker said that he wanted to find a way that will retain the existing advantages of New Zealand traders despite Brexit. Parker said that among the subjects discussed, were finding ways to cooperate such as Britain’s potential accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

Businesses preparing for Brexit

If the UK leaves the EU without a withdrawal agreement, it will be treated as a non-EU country. For this reason, it is significant that businesses in the EU prepare for this eventuality, if they have not already done so. Businesses that sell to, buy from, or move through the UK, goods, supplies or services will be affected.

Customs duties and restrictions

Without a transitional period, the UK will revert to the WTO rules. This will mean “declarations will have to be lodged and customs authorities may require guarantees for potential or existing customs debts; Customs duties will apply to goods entering the EU from the United Kingdom, without preferences. Prohibitions or restrictions may also apply to some goods entering the EU from the United Kingdom, which means that import or export licences might be required.”  No longer valid will be UK import and export licences, UK authorisations for customs simplifications or procedures and Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) authorisations. There will be VAT charges for imports of goods entering the EU from the UK, while exports to the UK will be exempt from VAT. Additionally many rules regarding declaration and payment of VAT will change.

It won’t be easy to move goods to the UK, as that it will require an export declaration. Movement of excise goods from the United Kingdom to the EU will have to go through customs before a movement under Excise Movement and Control System(EMCS) can commence.

UK businesses

UK businesses then that export, import or move goods and services through the UK will need to prepare by completing relevant documents so that the transition to post-Brexit Britain is as smooth as possible.

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