The British pound is higher against the Dollar and lower against the euro on Friday, after the release of disappointing data showing that the UK economy contracted more than expected.

The UK GDP monthly release came at -20.4%% MoM in April vs. -18.4% expected, revealing that the economy contracted more-than-expected in April. This is the biggest month-on-month drop in GDP ever recorded and 10 times larger than the sharpest fall before Covid-19. The figures show that the GDP fell by 10.4% in the three months to April as a whole.

The Gross Domestic Product is released by the Office for National Statistics and is a measure of the total value of all goods and services produced by the UK. It is a broad measure of the UK economic activity and, in general, positive news such as a rising trend in economic activity can have positive impact on the pound, while a drop in numbers can be negative. 

The ONS reported that “April 2020 has experienced sharper falls than March as the negative impacts of social distancing and ‘lockdown’ have led to a significant fall in consumer demand and business and factory closures, as well as supply chain disruptions.”

 

Biggest monthly fall in UK history

According to the Office for National Statistics, the UK posted the biggest monthly fall in GDP in UK history this past April. The drop represented a 24.5% decline from April 2019, as lockdowns due to Covid-19 hit the economy. 

This week the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said that the UK economy would experience the worst damage from Covid-19 compared to any other developed nation. It predicted that GDP would contract by 11.5% in 2020 or 14% if there was a second lockdown due to the return of the virus.

Anneliese Dodds, Labour’s shadow chancellor, said that the OECD forecast was “deeply worrying” and that this was due to the government’s “failure to get on top of the health crisis, delay going into lockdown and chaotic mismanagement of the exit from lockdown.” 

Rishi Sunak, said the UK economy was similar “with many other economies around the world” and that the government’s intention was to “support people, jobs and businesses through this crisis – and this is what we’ve done.”

 

The OECD explained that “The failure to conclude a trade deal with the European Union by the end of 2020 or put in place alternative arrangements would have a strongly negative effect on trade and jobs.” A no deal Brexit would “significantly damage the UK’s potentially fragile recovery from its deepest recession in almost a century,” credit ratings agency Moody’s warned.

Laurence Boone, the OECD’s chief economist, said the world economy was “walking a tightrope” and that the possibility of a second outbreak could lead to another lockdown and recession. She said: “These scenarios are by no means exhaustive, but they help frame the field of possibilities and sharpen policies to walk such uncharted grounds. Both scenarios are sobering, as economic activity does not and cannot return to normal under these circumstances. By the end of 2021, the loss of income exceeds that of any previous recession over the last 100 years outside wartime, with dire and long-lasting consequences for people, firms and governments.” 

 

With the latest GDP figures, it has been confirmed that the slump in economic activity has been severe. The pound fell against the euro but was not shocked as the disappointing numbers were expected. As Sunak highlighted, the UK is not alone in experiencing the economic contraction due to the lockdown, as global economies are deeply hurt.

If you are sending money abroad and are worried about the pound’s volatility due to the current market conditions, please get in touch with Universal Partners FX. UPFX’s dedicated foreign exchange specialists can help you access the most competitive exchange rates and make your currency transfers stress-free.